Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Quote of the Week

"We are not primarily called to do something or go somewhere; we are called to Someone. We are not called first to special work but to God. The key to answering the call is to be devoted to no one and to nothing above God himself."


8 comments:

Jimmy said...

i found this entry to be initially freeing and of great importance. I am the product of the "Potter's Wheel". he has entrusted gifts and abilities but they are for his purposes. i simply am a vessel to carry Him into the paths that he has laid before me. the problem there is the tendency to "let go and let God"
so, my next thought was how do i know what i am to be doing. Mark Altrogge, at Blazing Center, help me there today. i will focus on how God is helping me to grow in godly character and maturing in my faith, then i can trust the Holy Spirit will lead me in the path of righteousness that includes serving Him, his church and loving my neighbor.

Ted M. Gossard said...

Amen. Something important that is easily lost, and was part of what is the best of and what we can learn from the monastic tradition. I'm thinking on that lately, having a spiritual director and reading a bit of Thomas Merton right now. Excellent quote.

Sam Van Eman said...

Enjoyed this book, ESI. And it's always good to hear this reminder.

Every Square Inch said...

Jimmy - glad you found the quote helpful - I found it helpful myself as I reflected on how God's call on our lives involve much more than our jobs

Ted - haven't ever read Merton but love to hear your thoughts on what you are learning

Sam - not surpised that you've read and enjoyed the book.

Sam Van Eman said...

I first learned about Os Guinness through a good friend and extraordinary book seller, Byron Borger. They are long-time pals and since Byron espouses and lives out a robust work/faith theology, such as you write about here, he talks frequently about Guinness.

You could say that I had to read The Call. ;)

Halfmom said...

still around, even if far less often. still reading with even more appreciation.

Maalie said...

We are called to an invisble man in the sky? Well, speak for yourself because I haven't!

Ted M. Gossard said...

Merton is good, but speaks a language not familiar to me. But I will press on if time allows, and keep trying to process some of it. I like where his life seemed to go: from deeply contemplative world denying to much involvement in the world in the name of Christ without abandoning the deeply contemplative aspect. I can't track well with the Buddhist track in his life. He maintains the Christian distinctive on mediation through this, but I take it takes something of what is good and true within the eastern tradition. In line with the Roman Catholic teaching on this. I think we can learn something from it, though I am not knowledgeable enough to make a judgment beyond that. I am beginning to think Merton could be a life-long study. Too many books and too little time.